Archives For Speeches

Recently I gave a talk at the Personal Digital Archiving conference, in which I described what I’ve learned from 15+ years of using TheBrain.

It was a really fun talk to give, both because everyone present is working on how to preserve our many-faceted personal information, and because my use of TheBrain has given me many insights.

For a quick intro to my Brain before you watch this, view this earlier post of mine here.

The projected Brain you see in the video isn’t that clear, for which I apologize. You can partly make up for that by tracking where I go from my online Brain, starting here.

At a recent workshop, I gave a talk titled “Other Kinds of Innovation,” based on this Prezi

In it, I described three sources of innovation that tend to get short schrift in the whirlwind of books, talks and seminars abot innovation: social innovation, dark innovation and innovations by (not for) the poor.

The first of these, social innovation, is getting more attention thanks to books like The Wisdom of Crowds and Crowdsourcing, even though our culture seems to idolize the lone inventor. Fortunately, recent books like Steven Johnson’s Where Good Ideas Come From are tackling the myth of the lone inventor, but in our individualistic society, it’s a hard myth to shake. (In the Prezi above, this section is intentionally the least developed.)

The second kind of innovation that we often ignore is the category of innovations that are a net negative to society, which I’m calling dark innovations. These include defensive innovations by incumbents trying to postpone their doom, the unintended negative consequences of innovations created with good intent, and general overconfidence.

The third category is a subtle one in several ways. First, it’s not innovations for the poor, but rather by. Second, these innovations don’t always occur at the frenetic modern pace of innovation, so their pace can hide them. And third, some of these innovations are actually old, excellent ideas that have been buried for a few centuries and are now being rediscovered or reinvented, such as the methods of natural farming.

I intend to do a screencast of this Prezi, or perhaps several, but I’m posting now for a different reason.

Among the attendees as I presented was Peter Denning, who besides writing about innovation is the editor of the ACM‘s Ubiquity Magazine. Peter liked the perspective on dark innovation in particular, so we proceded to do an email interview, the results of which you can read here.

What do you think?

Spend a few minutes with Jordan Grader or Leah Perlman and you’ll discover why The Happiness Institute is bound to be a special place.

They’ve just opened the doors to HI and are still discovering who shows up and how they’ll use their space, which used to be a TV studio. It’s in its chrysalis phase, on the way to being a happiness-centered open university. Or something like that.

On Saturday, January 7, I’ll be exploring the Relationship Economy at HI from 10am to 4pm. In the spirit of happiness, you won’t be staring at my talking head the whole time. We’ll gnaw on some thorny questions together, hear from others with groovy, resonant ideas and mix it up, all with the goal of expanding our collective understanding of this Relationship Economy critter. We’ll also be recording a bunch, to create some media artifacts for use later.

Attendance maxes out at 70; the cost is a lunch fee. The Facebook invite page is here.

Background materials are mostly on this blog. I’d recommend the posts explaining the REXpedition, exploring abundance (in education) and looking at creators and Wikipedia. If you’re feeling adventuresome, learn about my Brain (and dive in yourself), and also browse the abundance and REX Prezis.

Giving two REX talks this week

Jerry —  February 21, 2011 — Leave a comment

If you’d like to hear about this REXpedition from me live, I’m doing two talks this week. One you can listen to; the other you can attend, if you’re in the Bay Area.

The first is a Zipcast tomorrow at 1pm Pacific.

What’s a Zipcast? It’s SlideShare’s answer to webinars. To participate in this one tomorrow, click on this link a few minutes before it starts. By the way, I’ll be in terrific company: the three Zipcasts before me are with Andrew McAfee, Jake Wengroff and BJ Fogg.

The second talk this week is a live one, in the old face-to-face mode, on Thursday evening at a nifty venue in the East Bay. Here’s the invite text:

Thursday, February 24th 7:00pm – 10:00pm

The NeXus and COREcommons present…

Relationship Economics
Navigating Massive Change Together
Jerry Michalski
Founder, The REXpedition

Presentation/Dialog/Networking

The NeXus
1414 Harbour Way South, #1010
Ford Point at Marina District
Richmond, CA 94804
Directions
Free Tea and Secure Parking

Tickets: $15 Advance; $20 Door
Purchase Tickets

REX is the Relationship Economy eXpedition.

The next social and industrial order has more to do with abundance and trust than with scarcity and stickiness. The key assets are trusted relationships.

In such a world, whom you trust and who trusts you are primary assets. You’ll choose the product (or vote for the candidate) that people you trust recommend, from among the abundant choices.

Here we’ll build key elements of the Relationship Economy, playing out what it means for business, culture, society, governance, education and more, because its effects will be widespread and durable.

This is the Relationship Economy, and we’ll be exploring it together.

Presented by COREcommons